USS Gearing DD-710
2014 reunion,
Nashville, Tennessee.

Photos and captions
from Bill Latta (PC3 65-67)
"The Experiencing Nashville Tour"









Continental breakfast at the Sheraton Music City.



Everyone had a great time catching up on each other’s lives
over a continental breakfast in the 2014 reunion’s
Hospitality Room at the Sheraton Music City Hotel in Nashville.



Ruth Ann and Charles Ankney (SN 1957-59), Don Hentges (EM2, 1958-61),
and Don Hentges grandson, Alex Hentges



Sue Kelly, Barbara Travassos, Bob Kelly, and Edmond Travassos (BM3, 1950-53).
Sue and Bob were guests of the Travassos.



The Experiencing Nashville Tour took us past
The War Memorial Auditorium at Legislative Plaza
in downtown Nashville.



The Experiencing Nashville Tour took us past The War Memorial
Auditorium at Legislative Plaza in downtown Nashville.



Flagpoles flying the Tennessee state flag, displaying three white
stars in a blue circle on a red field. The three stars represent
the three major divisions of Tennessee: West, Middle, and East Tennessee.



The USS Gearing group visits Tennessee’s WWII Memorial at
the Bicentennial Mall in Nashville.



A former USS Gearing shipmate quietly reflects on the words inscribed
and photos engraved into the granite monoliths at the Tennessee
WWII Memorial at Bicentennial Mall in Nashville.



Bob Ludema (SH3, 1951-55) gently spins the large black granite
world globe floating on a thin layer of water coming from the
fountain beneath its inscribed circular base.



A large black granite globe at Tennessee’s Bicentennial Mall in Nashville
is seen next to the last granite monolith, showing an engraved photo
of the nuclear explosion over Hiroshima, Japan. The large black granite
globe can be spun in any direction made possible by a thin layer of water
made possible by the water pressure coming from the fountain beneath its
inscribed circular base.



Former USS Gearing shipmates, spouses, and guests look on at
Tennessee’s WWII Memorial, during our tour of Nashville,
as our tour guide, Greg Patterson, speaks about the content
of the engraved granite monoliths and the significance of the memorial.



Former USS Gearing shipmates, spouses, and guests get off our
two tour buses to enter the world famous RCA Studio B,
where many music stars of all genre recorded their greatest hits.
Elvis Presley in particular favored this small studio owing
to its acoustics for his recordings over larger studios.



A sculpture of Elvis Presley’s signature guitar outside the entrance
to RCA Studio B in Nashville, TN.



Brenda, an RCA Studio B tour guide, speaks to our tour group
about all of the hit songs that were recorded in the studio
by well-known pop and country music artists over the years.
Displayed on the wall to her left are forty (45rpm) record labels
showing hits by Elvis recorded in this small studio that made
Billboard’s pop chart.



Former USS Gearing shipmates, spouses, and guests listen to music
made familiar and famous during their youth by songwriters and stars
who recorded their music at the small RCA Studio B in Nashville, TN.



The small, but legendary RCA Studio B in Nashville, TN. The Steinway piano
at right is where Elvis spent many late night and early morning sessions
playing and recording. On one occasion, after many unacceptable tries,
Elvis had Floyd Cramer turn out the lights and instructed his band they were
going to try to play it in the dark. The song went perfect until the end
when Elvis stood up from this piano and hit his head on the boom mike
overhead, making an unmistakable crackling sound at the very end of the
recording. Splicing over it repaired the last word in the song, but the
crackling sound could not be removed and was allowed to remain in the
recording and can still be heard at the very end if one is listening for
it. The song was “Are You Lonesome Tonight”, an old song that was a hit
for jazz singer Gene Austin in 1927.



Brenda, an RCA Studio B tour guide, tells the stories of famous music
stars who have recorded at RCA Studio B in Nashville, TN. Many of the stars
who have recorded here are: Chet Atkins, Porter Wagoner, Elvis Presley, Roy
Orbison, Hank Williams, Sr. and Jr. Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Waylon
Jennings, Dolly Parton, Bobby Bare, Charley Pride, and many others.



The Steinway piano at which many stars played and recorded their hit
music. Elvis Presley spent many late night and early morning hours
playing and recording at this piano.



Frank and Nancy Goetschius stand beside a sculpture of Roy
Orbison’s guitar outside RCA Studio B in Nashville, TN.



The east façade of the Parthenon in Nashville’s Centennial Park.
Nashville’s best kept secret, the Parthenon is the only full-scale replica
of the Greek original in Athens, Greece. Originally built of wood as the
centerpiece of a 1997 exposition to celebrate Nashville’s first one
hundred years as a city. By popular demand, it was rebuilt in aggregate
concrete in 1921 as a permanent landmark representing Nashville as the
“Athens of the South”, another moniker for the city.



Former shipmates, spouses, family members and friends from one of two bus
loads in our reunion group pose in front of the massive east façade of the
Parthenon in Nashville’s Centennial Park. The Nashville Parthenon is a
full-scale replica of the Greek original in Athens, Greece.



The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum at Nashville, TN.



Ray Bento (GMSN, 1956-60) points out something of interest to his wife,
Maria, and their guests while eating lunch at the 222 Grille in the lobby
of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, TN.



Bob Perreault (QM3, 1964-66) is seen with Roland Costen (SN, 1964-66)
and his fiancé, Jenalda McCory during lunch at the 222 Grille in the lobby
of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, TN.



The atrium, lobby, and 222 Grille greet visitors with stunning
contemporary architecture at the Country Music Hall of Fame and
Museum in Nashville, TN.



Michelle McEvoy, ____________and Bill McEvoy (YN3, 1955-58) view the many
country music artifacts and clothing worn by country music stars at their
many performances.



Bob Perreault (QM3, 1964-66) is seen with Roland Costen (SN, 1964-66)
and his fiancé, Jenalda McCory during lunch at the 222 Grille in the lobby
of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, TN.



The AT&T building, affectionately know by locals as the Bat Man Building,
is seen among the other tall buildings in downtown Nashville, TN.



The little honky tonk named Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge backs up across a
small alley from the back stage door of the Ryman Auditorium, the first
permanent home of country music. Many stars slipped out the back door of
the Ryman for a drink when not on stage performing. Many up-and-coming
stars got their start by performing gigs at Tootsies, and later
fulfilling their dreams to perform at the Ryman.



The Ryman Auditorium, the Mother Church of Country Music,
seen in this photo faces Forth Ave. N. and is where
many country music stars began their careers.