USS Gearing DD-710
2015 reunion,
Norfolk, Virginia.

Photos and captions
from Bill Latta (PC3 65-67)
"Virginia International Tattoo program and Williamsburg-Yorktown tour"





6063 2 – Jumbo Tron presenting the Virginia International Tattoo welcoming special guests to this prestigious event during the annual Norfolk, VA Arts Festival. The list of special guests begins with the USS Gearing (DD-710) Reunion.



6073 – The Virginia International Tattoo begins with a tremendous opening of bands, performers, and active military groups, who traveled from all parts of the world to perform in this annual event.



6075 – Presentation of the colors of the American flag during the Virginia International Tattoo in Norfolk, VA.



6077 – Opening bands and music at the Virginia International Tattoo in Norfolk, VA.



6078 – Members of the United States Fleet Forces Band performing at the Virginia International Tattoo in Norfolk, VA.



6093 – Members of the United States Fleet Forces Band perform during the Virginia International Tattoo in Norfolk, VA.



6147 – Marines of the U. S. Marine Corps band perform during the Virginia International Tattoo in Norfolk, VA.



6163 – A South Korean drummer and performers in traditional South Korean attire delight the audience with a beautiful, colorful, and fast-paced performance at the Virginia International Tattoo in Norfolk, VA.



6166 – Another South Korean drummer performs with dramatic precision during the Virginia International Tattoo in Norfolk, VA.



6173 – South Korean drummers line up with a rapid succession of mesmerizing drumbeats during the Virginia International Tattoo in Norfolk, VA.



6176 – South Korean dancers perform to traditional South Korean music in colorful fans and dress during the Virginia International Tattoo in Norfolk, VA.



6180 – South Korean dancers swirl in unison in a colorful display of South Korean traditional dance and music during the Virginia International Tattoo in Norfolk, VA.



6187 – A South Korean couple gracefully dances to traditional South Korean music during the Virginia International Tattoo in Norfolk, VA.



6209 – A young man dramatically dances in rapid rhythm with his fellow performers from South Korea during the Virginia International Tattoo in Norfolk, VA.



6217 – Performers from European countries entertain the audience during the Virginia International Tattoo in Norfolk, VA.



6226 – United States Marines stand at attention during the Virginia International Tattoo in Norfolk, VA.



6227 – The Virginia International Tattoo closes with a grand finale of music from bands, performers, and active military groups, during the Virginia International Tattoo in Norfolk, VA, who traveled from all parts of the world to perform in this annual event.



6236 – A man in period dress reinforces the 18th Century theme along the main street during our tour of Williamsburg, VA.



6238 – A guide points out and explains some of the landmarks and features of Williamsburg to the tour group.



6239 – Frank and Nancy Goetschius enjoy the sunshine and beautifully clear day during our tour of Williamsburg.



6242B – A coachman stands beside a beautiful carriage, representative of wealthy Williamsburg gentry during the colonial Period of early American history.



6247 – A young man in period dress of the 18th Century colonial dress sits on a bench outside the Williamsburg Printing Office, the establishment of the local newspaper and printing press. Public notices and announcements representative of the 18th Century period are posted on the tack board at the entrance. Since, many in the colonies could not read or write well, Rebus (picture images) signs, representing the services inside, were often hung outside each commercial establishment.



6249 – Close-up photo of reproductions of public notices and announcements from the 18th Century period are posted on the tack board at the entrance to the Printing Office.



6251 – A brick and mortar shop in colonial Williamsburg.



6254 – A very motley crew. Former shipmates, who served at the same time on the USS Gearing in the mid to late1960s, pause for a photo Op in the middle of Duke of Gloucester Street, the main (now pedestrian) street, in colonial Williamsburg, VA. Left to right is: Laurence Schongar (LTJG, 1963-65), Frank Goetschius (LTJG, 1963-65), Dan Donohue (FTG3, 1965-66), Bill Latta (PC3, 1965-67), Bobby Harris (BM1, 1965-69), and Bob Witkowski (FTG3, 1965-66).



6259 – The former home at Williamsburg of a colonist and his family, who were loyal to the cause of freedom and independence. His brother, who lived on the next street just around the corner, was loyal to the king, showing how divided families were just prior to the American Revolutionary War.



6260 – The Williamsburg Courthouse. This structure dates to the 18th Century and was the center of town for all things legal. Note the stocks at right for the purpose of public humiliation for those 18th Century citizens who might be so inclined as to misbehave.



6262 – Public Stocks (reproduction) outside the Court House at Williamsburg, VA. Justice was swift in colonial Williamsburg. Upon a decision of the judge and court, an accused for lesser crimes was taken out and placed in the wooden stocks as a public humiliation for his/her offence.



6263 – Of course, some Gearing shipmates just can’t seem to stay out of mischief and give-in to spending a bit of time in the wooden stocks. Goldie Goldstein (EM3, 1953-55) seems to panic a bit at the thought of being trapped—should no one come by to set him free.



6266 – 1715 Magazine at Williamsburg, VA, originally built to store equipment necessary for protection against Indians, slave revolts, riots, and pirate raids.



6267 – The opulent 1722 Governor’s Palace at Williamsburg.



6268- Our pedestrian tour took us past the old Bruton Parish Church, the first Anglican Church to be established in colonial America. Dating from 1715, the present structure is the third in a series of Anglican houses of worship that was built in 1660. It is the oldest church with continued services in America. The children of Martha Custis, wife of George Washington, from her first late husband are buried in the cemetery behind the church.



6270 – A carriage driver in colonial dress impresses our tour group with his well-appointed carriage as he passes along Duke of Gloucester street, the main street (now only pedestrian) in colonial Williamsburg, VA.



6271 – Our tour passed the former home of Martha and Daniel Custis had four children: Daniel, born in 1751; Frances, born in 1753; John (Jacky) born in 1755; and Martha (Patsy), born in 1756 or 1757. Daniel died at the age of three, and Frances died at four years of age. July 26, 1757,when Martha Custis was only 26 years old, her husband died suddenly. Her children are buried in the cemetery of the Bruton Parrish Church across the street in Williamsburg not far from this home. Martha later married Col. George Washington in January 1759.



6275 – Our tour passed this elegant, 19th Century home along Duke of Gloucester Street in colonial Williamsburg.



6276 – We were delighted to see this pastoral scene at colonial Williamsburg, reminding us that early colonial Williamsburg was only a rural English village at the time.



6301 – Our tour bus passes the sign for the historic colonial town of Yorktown, VA, circa 1681, and site of the last and decisive battle of the American Colonists against the British during the American Revolutionary War.



6307 – Upon our arrival, we could still see the remaining defensive breastworks the Colonists overran and used in their effort to drive out the British during the siege of the occupied Yorktown, VA. A canon rests atop a breastwork aimed toward the village of Yorktown just beyond the low-lying field and tree line in the distance.



6311 – Colonists directed their artillery fire across this low-lying field during the siege of British occupied Yorktown. This large canon on the crest of a breastwork sits symbolically aimed at the sleepy village of Yorktown that sits just beyond the tree line in the distance.