USS Gearing DD-710
2016 reunion,
Washington, DC.

Photos and captions
from Bill Latta (PC3 65-67)
"Hotel Hospitality Room, several Washington tour stops, plaque dedication and the memporial service."





1904 – Former shipmates, their spouses, family members, and guests gather in the Hospitality Room
to begin the 29th Annual USS Gearing (DD-710) Association Reunion held at the Crown Plaza Dulles
Airport Hotel in Herndon, VA just outside Washington, DC.



1905 - Former Gearing shipmates, their spouses, family and friends gather around to chat with
Len Holmberg, (CO, 1970-1972).  Len lives in Ashburn, Virginia, about seven miles from the Dulles Crowne Plaza.



1906 - Paul (SN, 1957-59) and Ruth Ann Ankney (left) enjoy an early chat in the Hospitality Room
with Bill (YN3, 1955-58) and Michelle McEvoy.



1909 - Jim Peiffer (SKSN, 1962-64) and his wife Marilynn wave hello as Pam Putinas,
wife of Bruce Putinas ((HT1, 1971) looks on.



1910 - Bob Witkowski (FTG3, 1965-66) chats with Bill Basnett (FN, 1956-57) and his wife DeLois.



1911 - Bill Beck (RD3m 1954-57), a first time attendee, brought his son Barry with him to the reunion
this year. They had a great time meeting with former shipmates and getting to know everyone.



1913 - On Thursday, we took a tour of Washington, DC. Here, we first saw the Iwo Jima Memorial.
This is a close-up detail of the bronze group. It is a representation of the famous photograph
made of the five men who raised the American flag on the embattled Japanese island of Iwo Jima
toward the end of WWII. The memorial was our first stop on our tour of Washington, DC.



1975 - The Iwo Jima Memorial adjacent to Arlington Cemetery in memory of all who gave their lives
to win the Battle of Iwo Jima for the Japanese held island near the end of WWII.



1984 - Jefferson Memorial with the silhouette of Jefferson’s statue beneath its massive
white marble dome in Washington, DC.



2003 - Washington Monument as seen from the Jefferson Memorial, Washington, DC.



2007 - Our Gearing tour group ascends the steps of the impressive domed Jefferson Memorial
with many other visitors on our tour of Washington, DC.



2014 - Our tour group is impressed with the large bronze statue of Thomas Jefferson, third president
of the United States and author of the Declaration of Independence. The statue stands centered beneath
the great dome of the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, DC.



2031 - The large bronze statue of Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States,
stands in the center of the interior of the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, DC.
The opening words of the Declaration of Independence written by Thomas Jefferson are emblazoned
on the white marble wall in the background.



2035 - Our tour guide (left) and Frank Goetschius (LTJG, 1863-65 [right]), our reunion host,
confer during the Washington, DC tour on the monumental steps of the Jefferson Memorial.



2041 - Our tour took us next to the Martin Luther King Memorial where we read
inscribed quotes of this famous civil rights activist and preacher. A colossal marble
statue symbolically depicts his image breaking out from adversity into freedom for all men.



2054 - Our tour took us next to visit the U.S. Navy Memorial.
These bronze bas-reliefs depict scenes of U.S. Navy battles and events as we entered
the large circular courtyard at the entrance to the memorial.



2055 - This inscription quotes John F. Kennedy about his service in the U.S. Navy is emblazoned
at the foot of the steps in the great courtyard at the entrance to the U.S. Navy Memorial.



2060 - Frank Goetschius (LTJG, 1963-65) leads the memorial service for departed shipmates
in the large theater inside the U.S. Navy Memorial Heritage Center in Washington, DC.



2061 - Carl Lloyd (RM3, 1945-46), chairman, Ken Baker (ETN3, 1962-64), history reading of the Gearing,
John Reeves (SN, 1956-58), chaplain, and Frank Goetschius (LTJG, 1963-65), reunion host
lead the memorial service for departed shipmates and their spouses. Following the memorial service,
Frank Goetschius revealed the image of a commemorative plaque funded by the association
and through donations made by former shipmates. Bill Latta, one of our own, designed the plaque
at the request of the Association. The plaque was dedicated in memory of the USS Gearing (DD-710)
and all who served on her. The plaque is now on permanent display on the Commemorative Wall
in the U.S. Navy Memorial Heritage Center.



2064 - Former shipmates, spouses, family, and friends take turns viewing the USS Gearing (DD-710)
plaque installed on the Commemorative Wall in the U.S. Navy Memorial Heritage Center.



2066 - Bill Latta, one of our own, designed the plaque at the request of the Association.
Bill discusses the purpose of the plaque’s design. It is a simple composition with a handsome photo
of the Gearing during sea operations in the Atlantic. The plaque is in memory of our once proud ship
and all who served aboard her. The plaque is now on permanent display on the Commemorative Wall
in the U.S. Navy Memorial Heritage Center.



2067 -Shipmates, spouses, family members, and friends enjoy a box lunch at the U.S. Navy Memorial
Heritage Center while surrounded with many handsome displays that conical our Navy’s history.



2069 - Shipmates, spouses, family members, and friends enjoy a box lunch at the U.S. Navy Memorial
Heritage Center while surrounded with many handsome displays that conical our Navy’s history.



2071 - Shipmates take advantage of their visit to the U.S. Navy Memorial Heritage Center
to enter their name, rate/rank, and ship in the official U.S. Navy Memorial Log.
Here other Gearing shipmates can locate fellow shipmates online through this large, growing database.
Unfortunately, if you have never fill out the log for yourself, it will be much more difficult
for other shipmates to find you.



2072 - This bronze statue depicts “The Lone Sailor”. The sailor stands permanent watch beside his sea bag
and large mooring cleat in the courtyard of the U.S. Navy Memorial and Heritage Center in Washington, DC.



2076 - Pennsylvania Avenue was blocked during our tour of Washington, DC by hydraulic steel barriers
that rise up through the pavement for a Norwegian embassy event at Blair House, the red brick house
in the background. Blair House is famous for housing American and foreign dignitaries while
in Washington as well as hosting such diplomatic events.



2077 - Our Washington tour passed to the left of the Corcoran Gallery of Art, to the east
and across the street from the Eisenhower Executive Office Building. This impressive gallery
is now permanently closed, owing to unfortunate financial difficulties. The fate of the collection
of over 17,000 works is questionable. The National Gallery is to take about 6,500 works, but the
balance is still in doubt as to where they may eventually be housed. Works by Durer, Michelangelo,>br>Rembrandt, and others are in the collection.



2081 - Our tour took a long walk around the Eisenhower Executive Office Building
to view the White House from the south lawn.



2095 - Our Washington tour took us next to the WWII Memorial.
The memorial is a large ellipse flanked at both ends by two forty-three foot
towering gray granite triumphal arches—one representing the Pacific Theater
(seen here), the other representing the Atlantic Theater. Fifty-six granite
monoliths representing each state and territory in the union stand atop the
elliptical granite walls to honor those who gave their lives to win the
ultimate victory in WWII.



2096 - The forty-three foot gray granite triumphal arch with four eagles
sculptured to support a massive wreath, representing the Pacific Theater,
towers above the south end of the WWII Memorial in Washington, DC
and greets us as our group enters the memorial.



2099 - Looking north from the Pacific tower we could see large monoliths representing
each state and territory of the United States during WWII.



2100 - Shipmates, wives, family members, and friends walk around the beautiful symmetrical
fountain and pool that anchors the entire memorial into a cohesive and dignified design.
Its gentle curved ends placed within a smaller rectangular shape seemed to represent
a quiet peace to everyone visiting the memorial.



2107 - Large monoliths can be seen with great bronze wreaths that flank the east and west of the WWII Memorial.



2110 - A large triumphal arch at the north end of the WWII Memorial
represents the Atlantic Theater. It is a twin of the large triumphal
arch at the south end of the memorial that represents the Pacific Theater.



2131 - Live flowered memorial wreaths, placed there by family,
private citizens, and veterans’ organizations, in memory of
loved ones this memorial symbolizes, lay beneath the central granite
inscription, “HERE WE MARK THE PRICE OF FREEDOM”.



2134 - Maria and Ray Bento (GMSN, 1956-60) look out over the memorial’s expanse, contemplating the great
sacrifice of those who are remembered and honored here at the WWII Memorial and the peace they secured.



2140 - Our group walked beneath both triumphal arches,
one representing the Atlantic Theater,
the other representing the Pacific Theater.
Beneath an interior dome that opens to the sky,
four great bronze eagles hold a wreath suspended
with ribbons of bronze from their beaks.



2145 - Ray Bento (GMSN, 1956-60) looks at a circular bronze plaque for World War II in the floor of the
arch of triumph, representing the Pacific Theater, at the south end of the WWII Memorial.
Inscribed in bronze letters are the words, “VICTORY IN THE AIR • VICTORY ON LAND • VICTORY AT SEA”.



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2147 - Our tour group walked around the perimeter of the triangular plan of the Korean Memorial
designed as a memorial to those who lost their lives in that conflict of which no treaty
has ever been signed. There we viewed life-size aluminum sculptures of soldiers in battle gear
sloshing through a green terrain of low-growing evergreen plants. It was extremely moving to all.



2148 - Life-size aluminum sculptures of soldiers in battle gear slosh through a green terrain
of low-growing evergreen plants. A black granite wall parallels a walkway in the background.
It is etched with ghostly images of soldiers’ faces among the faces of the Korean people from that war.



2150